Experimenting With Dip-Dyed Hair

woman with dip-dyed hair

Dip-dye and ombre colored hair have been quite popular for a few years now. The looks can be seen in both hi-fashion and street-style, and now you’re ready to give the trend a try too. You may be wondering what the difference is between dip-dyed and ombre colored hair; some of you might not have even known that there was a difference. Well, ladies, there is indeed a difference between dip-died and ombre hair! The easiest way to differentiate between the two is recognizing that ombre-colored-anything is the gradual process of once color smoothly blending into another. So when you look at ombre hair, you will notice that the chemically colored ends of the hair get gradually get lighter and lighter along the strands. Dip-dye, on the other hand, offers more of a solid transition from one color to the next – almost like a color block.

If you’re interested in dip-dyed hair, but aren’t ready to call your stylist and take the plunge at the salon that’s totally understandable. This bold look can be…well, bold. Which is why we’ve put together this step by step tutorial for you to experiment with dip-dyed hair at home. In doing so you should be able to get a good idea of how you feel about the look and if you think it’s something you’d want to consider more permanently.

  1. Before you go coloring your hair all shades of the rainbow, take the time to get inspired and figure out the color that you want. Even though this tutorial is only going to give you temporary color, it’s still going to stay put for a few weeks, so you’ll want to make sure that it’s a color you’ll be happy with.
  2. Once you’ve settled on a color, you’ll need to purchase a product that is labeled as “semi-permeate.” This will ensure that the color doesn’t last for months.
  3. In addition to the coloring product, those with darker hair may need to purchase a  lightening or bleaching product. The reason being that light colored tips is the key to achieving the actual color that you want; bleaching out the dark color from your hair allows the colored dye to set.
  4. When preparing to dip-dye, you should purchase more color than you think you need. It may seem silly, but the last thing you want to do is run out of color before you’ve completed coloring your hair. You should also purchase a pair of gloves, to avoid skin irritation and some sort of plastic cover-all for your counters.
  5. Be sure that you’re wearing an old shirt that you wouldn’t mind throwing out. Additionally, wrap your neck with an equally old towel to protect your skin from stain and irritation.
  6. Brush or comb hair that it already completely dry and set up all your products in front of you on the countertop. It’s easiest to do this in the bathroom that way you have a mirror right where you need it.
  7. Section by section, bleach the hair where you want the finished color to be. Because every bleaching product is different, it’s best that you follow the instructions for the product that you purchased.
  8. After you’ve rinsed out the bleach, repeat the same process with the color, directly on top of the bleached hair. You can either use a brush and paint it on, or you can literally dip each section of hair into the dye bowl and use your fingers to spread the color.
  9. After you’ve applied the color to each section wrap it in foil. This will help the product cure faster. Again, to ensure the best possible results from the product you purchased, follow the instructions on how long to let the product sit on the hair.
  10. Once the product has had enough time to color your locks, remove the foil wrappings and rinse the product out of your hair until the water runs clear. After the product is rinsed out wash your entire head of hair with conditioner only. Keep in mind that the more frequently that you wash your hair, the sooner the color will fade.

First Time Blonde

Blonde woman

If you haven’t yet noticed, blond is the hair color right now. From Kimmy K and Kylie Jenner to Miley Cyrus and Miranda Kerr, and even leading ladies of the silver screen such as Anne Hathaway and Emma Roberts have been spotted with lighter colored locks. Often times, we see these celebs with drastic hair color changes and assume that they went from chocolate brown to platinum during their lunch break, but this isn’t the case. Any colorist will tell you that going blonde is a process, and they’re not just pulling your leg. Depending on the natural color and type of hair you have, it can take anywhere from two to four salon visits to achieve the desired color. We’re not telling you this to discourage you, rather hoping that by reading this article you will be prepared for the blond transformation. Continue reading to learn more about what to expect and keep in mind during your first time going blonde.

Good Things Take Time
We talked about this briefly above, but we can’t stress enough that achieving blonde status doesn’t happen overnight. The main reason for this is to save your hair from detrimental damage. The darker hair you have to start, the greater amount of bleach is needed to get you to blonde. If your stylist left bleach on your locks for an extended period of time, you would leave the salon with a burning scalp and severe breakage – not to mention, it’s still unlikely that your locks would be the color you were hoping for. The take-home point of this is to have patience when it comes to achieving the color you want and keeping your hair healthy.

This isn’t a DIY Transition
Let’s be honest, dying your hair at home is risky business. Now, bleaching your hair at home, that’s asking for trouble. Chances are your hair will not turn out the color of your dreams, but it’s likely to turn various shades of orange, yellow, or even green. On top of that, often times the product in boxed color is much harder to alter or reverse in the event that you do try to lighten your own hair, only to realize that you need a stylist’s help.

You Might Want to Make it Facebook Official
Because going blonde is a major commitment, it takes time, effort, and dedication to keep your tresses looking their best. A general rule of thumb is that the greater contrast between your natural hair color and the blonde hair, the less amount of time between root touch ups.

TLC is a Must
Regardless of how blonde you go, you’ll need to carve out some time in your beauty routine for regular blonde hair TLC. Since it’s not your natural color, you’ll want to use a purple or tonight shampoo to keep your hair from turning too yellow. Additionally, it’s important to keep your hair hydrated and protected from the heat to keep it looking its best. Thinks like SPF-fortified hair products and hydrating masks should be in your arsenal at all times.

Removing Brassy Hair Tones

Any woman who’s ever colored or highlighted her hair blonde knows that the fresh-from-the-salon color doesn’t stay along for all that long. All it takes is a week’s worth of showers before your light and ashy strands start to lose their luster. Only a few short days-to-weeks later (depending on your lifestyle and environment) your highlights that were once as blonde as Brittany Spears’ are now yellow and brassy. Some women are okay with the brassier tinted shades, specifically those who go with a darker or caramel shade of blonde because the shifting of shades isn’t as noticeable. However, those who prefer a beachy bleach blonde shade, or even silver shade, will notice the color change almost immediately. Although the yellow hue is annoying, it’s almost guaranteed to happen. Luckily, it’s also easily to fix and prevent! Read on to find out what causes brassy hair tones and how to remove them!

Woman with brassy hair.

From Ashy to Brassy
Even though we use the name of one color to describe the color of our hair (i.e., brown, blonde, red), it’s actually a variety of warm and cool tones which alternate to create a dimensional appearance. Regardless of your hair color, the warm tones contribute to the hair’s appearance by giving it depth or darkness. The cool tones, on the other hand, balance the warm tones to give it the neutral color you see when you look in the mirror.

Of course, everyone’s hair color is a bit different from the next person’s; you could have 100 brunettes in the same room and have difficulty finding two people with the exact same shade of brown. If these 100 women bleached their hair to become blonde, however, those with naturally darker hair would be more susceptible to brassiness. The reason being that dark hair needs to go through a lightening process which changes the hair from brown to deep red, then to a pale yellow. When the hair becomes yellow it will then be toned with a dye to reach a natural looking ashy blonde color.

Now, take a moment to consider what happens after a naturally blonde haired woman dyes her hair brown, and then takes a few showers…the brown dye will ultimately start to fade. This is exactly what is happening to natural brunets when their blonde turns brassy – the toning dye is fading, but the result of the bleaching remains. Thus turning ashy blonde strands to golden and brassy yellow.

Woman with ashy blond hair.

From Brassy to Ashy
Knowing that bright blonde tresses dull due to the fading of toning hair color, wouldn’t it make sense to recolor the blonde strands? Well, it’s just that simple! When you tone, (a.k.a. add a toning color) to brassy hair, you are adding cool dimensions to your hair. This works to neutralize the hair by ridding copper and brassy tones and replacing them with silver ashy tones.

If your hair is already very brassy, the best thing you can do to cool the warm tones is to get a toning treatment. Whether you make an appointment to get it done at the salon, or you purchase an at home tonight treatment, you’ll get similar results. If you go to a salon, they are likely to use a gentle semi-permanent color which deposits the needed pigment into your strands to prevent damaging already weak hair. If you prefer to perform this process at home and are confident in your hair’s strength and stability, then you can find a brass-eliminating treatment where you would typically buy an at-home hair coloring kit.

If your hair is only slightly brassy, or even if it still has the majority of its ash, you can prevent the copper hue from ever making an appearance by investing in a high-quality toning shampoo. These shampoos are typically a bright purple or violet color. The purple color works to neutralize brassiness in its tracks. When using a toning shampoo one should take extra care to use an ultra-repairing and hydrating conditioner, the reason being that even the best purple shampoos are known to dry out healthy and hydrated strands.

Your Dream Color Is In A Box

 

Women dying her hair

While we almost always recommend that you see a professional when you’re in need (or in want) of a new dye job, we totally understand that there are instances that occur from time to time that leave you no other choice than to make a trip to the drugstore and journey down the boxed hair color isle. Since we know how difficult DIY dying seems, we’ve provided you with the necessary information you need to achieve your dream color when using boxed, at home color.

Before we get into it, it is important to understand that extreme color changes should not be attempted over the bathroom sink. If you are hoping to go from chocolate brown to bombshell blonde, we sincerely hope that you won’t attempt such a transformation at home. However, if you’re hoping to go only a few shades lighter or darker, then you’ve totally got this!

Know Your Natural Color
It’s essential that you know your natural color when deciding which boxed color to go with. You know the panel of colors on the side of the box? It shows the starting color next to the adjusted color after it’s been dyed. They think that many people don’t know that the starting color is what you should be basing that panel off of, not your current color of dyed hair. Choosing the box based on your natural color will increase your chances the dye doing exactly what you want it to do.

Play Dress Up
Have you ever seen a friend all dressed up in a Hallowed costume, wig and everything, and noticed how great they looked with the wig on? It happens more than you might think. While some people may notice how great a color looks on them by accident, that doesn’t mean you can’t figure out on purpose. If you’re thinking about changing the color of your locks, but scared that even a small change will make you look totally different, pay a visit to your local wig shop. Not only are you guaranteed to have fun trying out a plethora of hairstyles, but you’ll also get the opportunity to see exactly how the color you’re thinking about will look on you!

When In Doubt, Lighten Up
Even if you want your color to be a deep, vibrant shade, you should always buy the boxed color that’s a bit lighter than your desired shade. It doesn’t take a professional to know that boxed color doesn’t always come out as planned. Not to mention, the times that the color disappoints typically happen when it comes out darker than planned. It is this very reason that you should choose the color that is a bit lighter than what you actually want. If it turns out that you still want to go darker, it will be much easier than trying to lighten up.

Double Up
The longer hair you have, the more color you need. Many boxes give the suggested amount of dye that you will need in correspondence with hair length, which is undoubtedly every helpful. However, if you have a heavy hand or thicker hair than average, you may find that you’ll need more than the recommended amount. Make sure that you don’t run out of color by buying an extra box. If you don’t end up using it, you can keep in on hand to care for your roots or you can return it.

Summer Cut, Color and Style

Woman wearing sunglasses enjoying the summer months

With summer nearing its end some women may find themselves reminiscing on all the events (birthday bashes, wedding showers), milestones (graduation, job promotions), and changes (moving into a new house, making new friends) that have taken place this past season. Isn’t it funny how all these events happen and we don’t even notice all the change that’s taken place in our lives until we look back and notice just how different things are? Life changes are one thing, but hair changes are another. It’s known that even small changes to one’s hairdo can make a major difference. If you feel like your hair needs a bit of a summer update to coincide with the rest of your life, look no further. Below are the hottest cuts, colors, and styles of the summer, lucky for you there’s still enough time left in the season for you to pull ‘em off!

Women with bob hairstyle

One of the season’s hottest trends is the bob; whether you’re into a lob or a classic bob you’re sure to turn heads with this look. This style is perfect for those who feel like they are constantly flipping, tossing, and touching their hair – feel like you’re throwing your hair into a bun before you’ve even made it to your morning meeting? This style is ideal for you as well. Not only does it get the hair off of your neck, shoulders, and back, but it also provides allows for a bit of cool relief around your upper body as you battle through the dog days of summer.

If you’re one of those who jokes about being “cold blooded” chances are you love the summer and all the heat it brings. Maybe wearing your hair down has become a mere habit simply to keep your ears, neck, and cheeks warm in the winter. If this sounds familiar, a bob might not be the small change you’re looking for, however, long layers might tickle your fancy. Rather than having your ends lay in a straight blunt line, have your stylist create long, yet soft layers. This sexy style gives hair some extra volume and texture which is perfect for all your favorite updos and downdos.

Women with stylish bangs

Baby bangs are the bomb this summer. It may seem strange that we’re proposing bangs immediately after suggesting a bob, but give the idea a chance. Baby bangs are only about half as long as regular bangs, so they do require some extra maintenance, but it’s nothing too major. They’re best for those who have large foreheads (a.k.a. all the five-head beauties out there), otherwise, they look a tad bit awkward. Although, if you have the space and are looking for a small change for summer, baby bangs are a perfect choice.

Already content with your hair cut, but dying to change the color? You’re not alone. We’ve turned to celeb stylists to find out what colors are sizzling up this summer, here’s what we found. If you’re looking to update your blonde mane check out the following color options: pale flaxen blonde, platinum gray, or soft butter highlights. If you’re considering updating your red roots check out rose gold red highlights or gradient copper. If your brown locks are looking more blah than anything else lately check out these color options: cool mocha, dark walnut, three-dimensional brunette, or mahogany.

Transitioning from Chemically Treated Hair

Woman holding her hair

A study conducted in the year 2008 offered two results that stuck out to us; the first major result was that 75 percent of women in the US dye their hair on a regular basis. The second statistic which caught our attention as that a whopping 88 percent of American women feel that their hair has an effect on their confidence levels!

If you’re like the majority of women in the country, you’ve colored your hair for all kinds of reasons. Whether you’ve done so to hide a few grays or you just generally enjoy the ability to change the color of your hair, you may have finally decided that you’re ready to go chemical free and let your natural locks grow free. Many people find themselves at this point for a variety of reasons. Whatever your reason, we’re here to help; read on to find out how you can successfully transition from chemically treated hair.

Do you highlight your hair on the regular?
If so, your transition away from chemically treated hair is arguably the easiest. Simply work on growing out those locks without coloring them, keeping in mind that you’ll have to rock different colored roots for a few weeks. The roots aren’t all bad, though! Since the ombre look is in, you should totally embrace the look of your grown out dye job. If you can’t stand the outgrown look, that’s okay too. You can have low lights placed in, reaping the chemical benefits just once or twice more. The lowlights will give you more of a natural look as you let the color grow out.

Do you color your hair a darker shade?
If you darken your hair on your own, it is probably worth your while to visit a professional for this transition. You should allow your hair to grow out for about two-to-three months, this way the stylist is able to get a goof idea of your natural hair color. Depending how dark you typically dye your hair, the stylist will with lighten the color or strip the color, either way, they have the goal of “lifting” the color. Once the color has been listed, they will re-color your hair by applying a solution that will produce your natural color. After that, your hair will continue to grow out and match the dye-job.

Have you been hiding grays?
If you’re ready to embrace your natural silver streaks, understand that the process may involve a bit more their the first two. Unfortunately, there isn’t a magic gray shade that works for everyone because believe it or not, everyone’s shade of gray is different. That said, here are a few options for you to consider when transitioning from chemically treated hair.

– Depending on your current hairstyle, you will benefit from frequent, shortcuts. Obviously, your natural hair color will fully grow out much faster if you’re rocking a pixie cut.

– Assuming that your hair isn’t totally gray yet, you can have your stylist put in some highlights or lowlights (whichever suit the color of your natural hair) to help with the transition until your natural hair has grown all the way out.

– Instead of coloring your hair with a permeate color, use a demi- permeate. Demi colors don’t completely cover grays and they fade rather quick. Although many people avoid demi’s for these reasons, it makes them a great choice to cover your new-growth roots with, since they will allow the gray to shine through and over time all will fade to your natural color.

Understanding Hair Porosity

Woman combing her hair

Although the term “hair porosity” seems intimidating, it’s really quite simple! Hair porosity can be easily understood as the hair’s ability to engross and maintain hydration and moisture. When one’s has high porosity it’s cuticle is often more vulnerable to damage and breakage. Even more, hair that has high levels of porosity is more likely to develop cracks and cavities, which fail to prevent moisture from taking over the hair structure. When this happens, the hair becomes tangled and frizzy, feeling dry and gnarly.

Similarly, yet not exactly the same, those who have hair with low porosity levels have hair, which is ultra sensitive to protein, causing it to feel dry, dehydrated, and easily breakable. This is because hair with a low porosity is made up of cuticles, which rest flat as they constrict the hairs cortex. This constriction prevents the hair from becoming moist and hydrated, which leads to hair product build up, causing the hair to feel dry and fragile.

Clearly, the circumstances of both high and low porosity are far from optimal. Contrary to the previous, hair with a normal porosity has the ability to absorb the hydration it craves, and even maintain this hydration. Since the hair cuticle is in an ideal condition, it feels healthy and smooth, looks shiny, and is able to maintain volume.

How Porous Is Your Hair?
If you’re not sure where your hair falls on the porosity scale the “float test” an east way to find out.

Start be filling a small bowl with room temperature water. Put a few strands of clean hair into the water. You can gather this from the hair that slips onto your comb or brush when you’re detangling your hair post-shower; It’s important that the hair is clean to achieve the best results. Let the hair rest in the bowl or water for about three or four minutes, being sure to watch it the whole time. If your hair sinks to the bottom of the bowl, it has high porosity. Consequently, if your hair remains to float after four minutes or so, it has low porosity. Finally, if your hair sinks at a slow, steady pace, it has a normal porosity.

Managing Porosity
Now that you have a solid understand of what hair porosity is and how to figure out just how porous your hair is, here are a few tips on how to manage your hair, regardless of its porosity levels.

  • If you have low porosity: you should be focusing on opening the hair cuticle to let moisture in! An awesome (and relaxing) way to do this is by throwing a towel into the clothes drier while you saturate your locks with an argan oil or grapeseed oil based hair mask. Warp the heated towel around your head to make sure the oils reach their full potential.
  • If you have normal porosity: keep doing whatever you’re doing – it’s working! Do you have any tips to share? Post them in the comments.
  • If you have high porosity: you need to focus on deep conditioning treatments. Some options include an aloe and coconut oil hair mask, or a raw egg mask. Try to use hair products which are meant to hydrate and restore dry and damaged hair.

Take Years Off Your Look

Woman  getting her hair colored

The inevitable thing about life is we all get older; whether we like to accept it or not, part of getting older is acting and looking the part. Truth be told, your skin tone probably is not the same shade that it was in college. So why are you still getting your roots colored the same shade that you chose when you landed your first job? Believe it or not, one of the biggest secrets to taking years off your look is to choose the best color for your current skin tone. Now, one thing to keep in mind is that skin tone and skin color are not exactly the same thing. Typically, skin tone is described as warm, cool, or neutral; this is the skin’s undertone that shows through the color of the surface of your skin. This means that regardless of various changes in the actual color of skin (such as a sun tan or skin rash) the skin tone always remains the same.

Keeping the above in mind, your skin color or your complexion tends to develop a dull color, or what some might call pale. When your hair color is the suited to your skin tone, the dulling skin makes it more obvious, and it can make you look drained and tired. No one should look washed out, even on their worst days! To make sure you look your best at any age, keep reading and find out which color complements your skin tone.

Fair with Cool Undertones
You should try… an auburn hair color with a shine reflecting dimension, this will bring out the natural pink in your cheeks, making you skin appear fuller and younger! If you’re not one for reds, you may like a multidimensional blond hair color, which will offset any dullness in your facial skin, making your skin like brighter.

Fair with Warm Undertones
You should try… soft copper colored hair. This color will flatter your age by creating an illusion to soften wrinkles and fine lines, especially around the eyes.

Between Fair and Medium with Warm Undertones
You should try… a natural looking ombre, much like Julia Roberts sun-kissed look. The low placed lighter colors draw attention away from the hallowing areas of the face, giving the appearance of immature facial skin.

Medium with Cool Undertones
You should try… a silky soft black hair color. As long as you don’t kill and dry out your hair with heat tools day after day, your hair will give off a young radiance. Keep in mind that jet-black can be harsh, but if you stick to a soft black your complexion will appear smooth and young.

Medium with Warm Undertones
You should try… a golden or milk chocolate brown hair color. This color is one that flatters women of any age. This works even better if you have brown eyes! The coordination your hair and eye colors create a natural bronze appearance for youthful looking skin.

Best Way To Get Rid Of Grays

Those aren’t gray hairs;
They’re strands of glitter growing from my head.
||Source: Pintrest||

The truth of the matter is no one likes going gray; however everyone sprouts a gray lock at some point in time, it’s simply inevitable! Fortunately, women have been opposed to going gray for quite some time now, which means there are age-old beauty hacks to fix the lifeless looking locks. Continue reading to first find out why hair your hair turns gray, and then learn the best ways to get rid of those pesky grays. You can thank us later.

Woman with white hair

Going Gray
Whether you sprouted your first gray the day before you graduated college or the after your daughter graduated college you hair went through the same process, here’s what happens: our human hair (as well as the hair of a considerable amount of other animals) naturally contains hydrogen peroxide within the hair follicle. In addition to hydrogen peroxide, the hair is made up of something called the hair catalase, which is comprised of enzymes. The enzymes in the catalase initiate the hydrogen peroxide in the hair to generate oxygen and water. This process occurs over and over when the hair is young. However, as the hair ages its enzyme catalase weakens, so the once-active conversion process slows and doesn’t take place as frequently as it once did. This means that the hydrogen peroxide begins to accumulate throughout the hair follicle, which in turn causes the hair to lose its color from the inside out. Of course, in losing its color it will begin to appear gray until you take action.

Woman with gray hair

Getting Rid of the Gray
With an understanding of why the hair decolorizes, you can combat the grays. Here are some tried and true, and scientific tips of how to do so.

  • Offset the gray color by distracting the eye with a mix of highlights and lowlights. While this isn’t changing the hair’s process of turning gray, it does allow you to hide the unwanted color.
  • Prepare one of the following:  black tea, curry leaves, ginger, henna, ridge guard (after you’ve done a few minutes of reading up on the product you choose, to find which one is best for you) and apply it on your locks. Keep in mind that naturally repairing gray hair takes time, and the most immediate result will always come from professionally applied artificial hair color.
  • If you are a smoker, here’s another reason to quit: not only can you prevent grays, but there is convincing evidence that you can reverse grays.
  • A wonderful way to manage gray hair, as well as your overall health, is to be sure that you’re consuming a balanced diet. Additionally, you should be most certain that you are getting the proper amounts of vitamin B12 and B6, as they are key to keeping your hair it’s natural color. Because we know it can be hard to maintain a balanced diet all the time, you can get into the habit of taking a vitamin B complex supplement every morning.

Summer Hair Care Tips

Woman with beautiful hair

There’s no better way to spend the sweet summertime days and nights than in the great outdoors. The summer welcomes comfy clothing, minimal makeup, and natural hair. It may be impossible to fall out of love with summer ways, but that doesn’t mean that there aren’t health and beauty conflicts throughout the season. Many of us have been versed a time or two on the proper way to care for and protect out skin during the warmer months, but few of us have taken into consideration the necessary measures that should be taken to safeguard those tresses. Since the sun has been putting in the overtime, we thought we should shed some light on some tried and true summer hair care tips. 

Hit Snooze and Skip the Shampoo
As you may have heard, scrubbing your scalp with shampoo doesn’t just cleanse your locks, but it has been found to strip the hair of its healthy natural oils. Naturally, it seems ideal to rid the hair of oil, but the thing is, hair that is over washed compensates for the continual oil loss by amping up oil production, leaving your hair more and more greasy looking over time. Instead of  washing your hair with shampoo in the shower, simply sleep in a bit later and skip your shower every few days. If you absolutely need to shower, try rinsing your hair directly under the shower head for a few minutes to help reduce the excess oil.

Woman applying conditioner

Conditioner is Key
We’re true believers that saltwater and all day pool days are good for the soul, but sadly, all the sodium and chlorine isn’t the best thing for your tresses. Reverse the damage caused by the elements by using a deep conditioning treatment on a regular basis.

Better Safe than Sorry, Use Protection
Often times we overlook the fact that out scalp is just as susceptible to sunburn as is our skin. Not only that, but our hair is not able to provide the adequate UVA and UVB protection. There are a few different options to prevent your scalp from burning this summer:

  • Look into shampoos and conditioners that contain sunblock
  • Mix a small amount of oil-free sunscreen in the palm of your hand with your regular hair product. This way you’re killing two birds with one stone in mere seconds.
  • Whenever possible, sport a cute baseball cap or floppy monogrammed sun hat.

Give Your Blowdryer a Day Off
It’s no secret that applying continual heat to the hair on a regular basis isn’t hair-healthy. Chances are that the temperature outside is as high as the low or medium setting on your blow-dryer, so why not let your hair dry naturally? Of course, there are days when the time commitment to air-drying isn’t realistic, but the take home point here is that whenever possible, you should give all heat tools a day off.

Don’t Crack Under Pressure
We’ve all done it before: gathered our hair into the perfect style, secured it with elastics and bobby pins only to realize that a single strand of hair was being pulled so much that it was causing an uncomfortable painful sensation. Remember, pain is the body’s way to tell us something is wrong! When you’re experiencing hair-pulling scalp-pain, it’s because those locks are being pulled so tight that they are about to split and snap. You hair is already in a vulnerable state in the summer, simply avoid splitting due to too-tight styles by opting for loose braids and messy buns.