Hair Dye Gone Wrong

angry customer salon

Do you dye your hair at home often?  There are so many at home options available these days that it can definitely be tempting to take the job on yourself.  However, there are some things that can go wrong with at home hair dyes, causing a hair dye gone wrong situation to arise.  We know no one wants to be faced with that kind of hair catastrophe, but unfortunately it’s something that can happen in certain situations.  Even if you’re careful and are sure to follow the instructions on the label of the hair dye product you’re using things can happen.

You may have a friend or known someone (maybe it was even you) who had a bit of a hair dye gone wrong situation happen.  Anytime you’re dying your hair there are so many different factors that can play into hair dye going in a negative way.  Since these are chemicals you’re working with, it’s important to make sure that you have the right information and products to use to try to avoid any hair dye gone wrong situations from happening.  Experts suggest that you’re more likely to have a troubled situation come up if you’re not quite used to dying your hair or really knowing how it tends to behave in situations.

Experts suggest that the most important thing to understand when coloring your hair at home is to fully understand the process that needs to take place in order to get your hair to the color that you’re looking to create before actually starting the process.  Not understanding the process is often what leads to some ladies trying to bleach their hair blonde and ending up with pink hair.  It’s important to make sure that you’re clear on your hair’s type and texture to make sure that you get the right type of hair dye products that will work with your hair as much as possible.  Not using the right process or products can lead to you having those hair dye gone wrong situations you’re trying to avoid.

If you do experience a hair dye gone wrong mishap, experts suggest trying to utilize a clarifying shampoo product as quickly as possible to eliminate some of the product from your hair before it sets in too much.  In addition, you’re going to want to make sure that you follow up that clarifying shampoo product with a deep conditioner.  Putting your hair through a lot with coloring and then trying to fix a hair dye gone wrong can put a lot of strain and dryness on your hair – adding some deep conditioning into your hair as quickly as possible will help get your hair back into the process of being treated and moisturized so you don’t deal with too much damage after.

Of course, if you experience a hair dye gone wrong and can’t seem to get the fix at home – it’s time to make an appointment with a trusted professional.  They can help ensure that your hair’s health is taken care of and help get you to a hair color place that you’ll be much happier with.

Experimenting With Dip-Dyed Hair

woman with dip-dyed hair

Dip-dye and ombre colored hair have been quite popular for a few years now. The looks can be seen in both hi-fashion and street-style, and now you’re ready to give the trend a try too. You may be wondering what the difference is between dip-dyed and ombre colored hair; some of you might not have even known that there was a difference. Well, ladies, there is indeed a difference between dip-died and ombre hair! The easiest way to differentiate between the two is recognizing that ombre-colored-anything is the gradual process of once color smoothly blending into another. So when you look at ombre hair, you will notice that the chemically colored ends of the hair get gradually get lighter and lighter along the strands. Dip-dye, on the other hand, offers more of a solid transition from one color to the next – almost like a color block.

If you’re interested in dip-dyed hair, but aren’t ready to call your stylist and take the plunge at the salon that’s totally understandable. This bold look can be…well, bold. Which is why we’ve put together this step by step tutorial for you to experiment with dip-dyed hair at home. In doing so you should be able to get a good idea of how you feel about the look and if you think it’s something you’d want to consider more permanently.

  1. Before you go coloring your hair all shades of the rainbow, take the time to get inspired and figure out the color that you want. Even though this tutorial is only going to give you temporary color, it’s still going to stay put for a few weeks, so you’ll want to make sure that it’s a color you’ll be happy with.
  2. Once you’ve settled on a color, you’ll need to purchase a product that is labeled as “semi-permeate.” This will ensure that the color doesn’t last for months.
  3. In addition to the coloring product, those with darker hair may need to purchase a  lightening or bleaching product. The reason being that light colored tips is the key to achieving the actual color that you want; bleaching out the dark color from your hair allows the colored dye to set.
  4. When preparing to dip-dye, you should purchase more color than you think you need. It may seem silly, but the last thing you want to do is run out of color before you’ve completed coloring your hair. You should also purchase a pair of gloves, to avoid skin irritation and some sort of plastic cover-all for your counters.
  5. Be sure that you’re wearing an old shirt that you wouldn’t mind throwing out. Additionally, wrap your neck with an equally old towel to protect your skin from stain and irritation.
  6. Brush or comb hair that it already completely dry and set up all your products in front of you on the countertop. It’s easiest to do this in the bathroom that way you have a mirror right where you need it.
  7. Section by section, bleach the hair where you want the finished color to be. Because every bleaching product is different, it’s best that you follow the instructions for the product that you purchased.
  8. After you’ve rinsed out the bleach, repeat the same process with the color, directly on top of the bleached hair. You can either use a brush and paint it on, or you can literally dip each section of hair into the dye bowl and use your fingers to spread the color.
  9. After you’ve applied the color to each section wrap it in foil. This will help the product cure faster. Again, to ensure the best possible results from the product you purchased, follow the instructions on how long to let the product sit on the hair.
  10. Once the product has had enough time to color your locks, remove the foil wrappings and rinse the product out of your hair until the water runs clear. After the product is rinsed out wash your entire head of hair with conditioner only. Keep in mind that the more frequently that you wash your hair, the sooner the color will fade.

First Time Blonde

Blonde woman

If you haven’t yet noticed, blond is the hair color right now. From Kimmy K and Kylie Jenner to Miley Cyrus and Miranda Kerr, and even leading ladies of the silver screen such as Anne Hathaway and Emma Roberts have been spotted with lighter colored locks. Often times, we see these celebs with drastic hair color changes and assume that they went from chocolate brown to platinum during their lunch break, but this isn’t the case. Any colorist will tell you that going blonde is a process, and they’re not just pulling your leg. Depending on the natural color and type of hair you have, it can take anywhere from two to four salon visits to achieve the desired color. We’re not telling you this to discourage you, rather hoping that by reading this article you will be prepared for the blond transformation. Continue reading to learn more about what to expect and keep in mind during your first time going blonde.

Good Things Take Time
We talked about this briefly above, but we can’t stress enough that achieving blonde status doesn’t happen overnight. The main reason for this is to save your hair from detrimental damage. The darker hair you have to start, the greater amount of bleach is needed to get you to blonde. If your stylist left bleach on your locks for an extended period of time, you would leave the salon with a burning scalp and severe breakage – not to mention, it’s still unlikely that your locks would be the color you were hoping for. The take-home point of this is to have patience when it comes to achieving the color you want and keeping your hair healthy.

This isn’t a DIY Transition
Let’s be honest, dying your hair at home is risky business. Now, bleaching your hair at home, that’s asking for trouble. Chances are your hair will not turn out the color of your dreams, but it’s likely to turn various shades of orange, yellow, or even green. On top of that, often times the product in boxed color is much harder to alter or reverse in the event that you do try to lighten your own hair, only to realize that you need a stylist’s help.

You Might Want to Make it Facebook Official
Because going blonde is a major commitment, it takes time, effort, and dedication to keep your tresses looking their best. A general rule of thumb is that the greater contrast between your natural hair color and the blonde hair, the less amount of time between root touch ups.

TLC is a Must
Regardless of how blonde you go, you’ll need to carve out some time in your beauty routine for regular blonde hair TLC. Since it’s not your natural color, you’ll want to use a purple or tonight shampoo to keep your hair from turning too yellow. Additionally, it’s important to keep your hair hydrated and protected from the heat to keep it looking its best. Thinks like SPF-fortified hair products and hydrating masks should be in your arsenal at all times.

All You Need to Know About Hair Texture

Woman combing her hair

When choosing a hairstyle, there isn’t a single thing more important to consider than your hair texture. Just about everyone has experienced either first hand or knows someone who has hair that is straight, wavy, curly, or frizzy/kinky. While this quad of adjectives does describe hair’s texture, these attributes are more-or-less changeable. On the contrary, understanding the attributes of your hair’s width and pattern, which are (for the most part) unchangeable, can help you truly understand your hair’s texture. No matter what shape hair holds – straight, wavy, curly, or frizzy/kinky – there is the possibility that is one of the three following widths of texture: fine, medium, or thick/coarse.

These width descriptors – fine, medium, thick/coarse – aren’t used to explain how the hair feels in your hands, rather it describes the thinness or thickness of each individual piece of hair. The standard measurement which is used to determine the width of texture is the thickness of a piece of sewing thread. If a single strand of hair is thinner than a piece of thread, then it is labeled as fine; If a strand of hair is the same width of a piece of thread, it is medium; if a strand of hair is thicker than a piece of thread then it thick/coarse.

So, what does this all mean? Well, a few things really; knowing the width of your hair can help you figure out why your hair “acts” a certain way, and knowing these common hair behaviors can help you style your hair so that it’s always looking its best.

Fine Hair
Typical behaviors of fine hair include not holding styles (i.e. curls) for very long, is easily weighed down by heavy product or too much product, often looks thin, and has a tendency to break easily. While it might not always seem like it, individuals who have “fine” hair texture actually have more hair than those with thick hair. Those with fine hair may also notice that their hair gets oilier faster than others. If you find that achieving volume is a struggle, you should try out either a texturizing powder or a dry shampoo. Both products contain ingredients that absorb oils and bond to the cuticle of the hair, giving it a temporary thickness without weighing it down like most products.

Medium Hair
Typical behaviors for medium hair include the ability to maintain style; a tendency to cover the surface area of the scalp; and it’s typically resilient to breakage. Those with medium hair will find that because their hair is less prone to breakage that it can hold just about any style. One thing that individuals with medium hair may struggle with is dehydration or dryness of the strands. To cure and prevent dry hair you should use a leave in conditioner after washing and get into the habit of using a conditioning mask on a semi-regular basis.

Thick or Coarse Hair
Typical behaviors of thick/coarse hair include a dense, full appearance; the ability to maintain styles with little hair spray; a high heat tolerance; and it is often unwilling to take to chemical hair color. Those with thick or coarse hair may never need extra-hold hairspray, but they do need some sturdy hair elastics. Unlike fine and medium hair, thick or coarse hair contains three layers: the cortex, the cuticle, and (the additional layer) the medulla. Although the medulla is filled almost entirely with air, it’s the protein in its composition that gives it the extra strength. If you find that your hair is resilient to hair color, talk to your stylist about a color compositing shampoo which will prevent the color from fading.

Removing Brassy Hair Tones

Any woman who’s ever colored or highlighted her hair blonde knows that the fresh-from-the-salon color doesn’t stay along for all that long. All it takes is a week’s worth of showers before your light and ashy strands start to lose their luster. Only a few short days-to-weeks later (depending on your lifestyle and environment) your highlights that were once as blonde as Brittany Spears’ are now yellow and brassy. Some women are okay with the brassier tinted shades, specifically those who go with a darker or caramel shade of blonde because the shifting of shades isn’t as noticeable. However, those who prefer a beachy bleach blonde shade, or even silver shade, will notice the color change almost immediately. Although the yellow hue is annoying, it’s almost guaranteed to happen. Luckily, it’s also easily to fix and prevent! Read on to find out what causes brassy hair tones and how to remove them!

Woman with brassy hair.

From Ashy to Brassy
Even though we use the name of one color to describe the color of our hair (i.e., brown, blonde, red), it’s actually a variety of warm and cool tones which alternate to create a dimensional appearance. Regardless of your hair color, the warm tones contribute to the hair’s appearance by giving it depth or darkness. The cool tones, on the other hand, balance the warm tones to give it the neutral color you see when you look in the mirror.

Of course, everyone’s hair color is a bit different from the next person’s; you could have 100 brunettes in the same room and have difficulty finding two people with the exact same shade of brown. If these 100 women bleached their hair to become blonde, however, those with naturally darker hair would be more susceptible to brassiness. The reason being that dark hair needs to go through a lightening process which changes the hair from brown to deep red, then to a pale yellow. When the hair becomes yellow it will then be toned with a dye to reach a natural looking ashy blonde color.

Now, take a moment to consider what happens after a naturally blonde haired woman dyes her hair brown, and then takes a few showers…the brown dye will ultimately start to fade. This is exactly what is happening to natural brunets when their blonde turns brassy – the toning dye is fading, but the result of the bleaching remains. Thus turning ashy blonde strands to golden and brassy yellow.

Woman with ashy blond hair.

From Brassy to Ashy
Knowing that bright blonde tresses dull due to the fading of toning hair color, wouldn’t it make sense to recolor the blonde strands? Well, it’s just that simple! When you tone, (a.k.a. add a toning color) to brassy hair, you are adding cool dimensions to your hair. This works to neutralize the hair by ridding copper and brassy tones and replacing them with silver ashy tones.

If your hair is already very brassy, the best thing you can do to cool the warm tones is to get a toning treatment. Whether you make an appointment to get it done at the salon, or you purchase an at home tonight treatment, you’ll get similar results. If you go to a salon, they are likely to use a gentle semi-permanent color which deposits the needed pigment into your strands to prevent damaging already weak hair. If you prefer to perform this process at home and are confident in your hair’s strength and stability, then you can find a brass-eliminating treatment where you would typically buy an at-home hair coloring kit.

If your hair is only slightly brassy, or even if it still has the majority of its ash, you can prevent the copper hue from ever making an appearance by investing in a high-quality toning shampoo. These shampoos are typically a bright purple or violet color. The purple color works to neutralize brassiness in its tracks. When using a toning shampoo one should take extra care to use an ultra-repairing and hydrating conditioner, the reason being that even the best purple shampoos are known to dry out healthy and hydrated strands.

Transitioning from Chemically Treated Hair

Woman holding her hair

A study conducted in the year 2008 offered two results that stuck out to us; the first major result was that 75 percent of women in the US dye their hair on a regular basis. The second statistic which caught our attention as that a whopping 88 percent of American women feel that their hair has an effect on their confidence levels!

If you’re like the majority of women in the country, you’ve colored your hair for all kinds of reasons. Whether you’ve done so to hide a few grays or you just generally enjoy the ability to change the color of your hair, you may have finally decided that you’re ready to go chemical free and let your natural locks grow free. Many people find themselves at this point for a variety of reasons. Whatever your reason, we’re here to help; read on to find out how you can successfully transition from chemically treated hair.

Do you highlight your hair on the regular?
If so, your transition away from chemically treated hair is arguably the easiest. Simply work on growing out those locks without coloring them, keeping in mind that you’ll have to rock different colored roots for a few weeks. The roots aren’t all bad, though! Since the ombre look is in, you should totally embrace the look of your grown out dye job. If you can’t stand the outgrown look, that’s okay too. You can have low lights placed in, reaping the chemical benefits just once or twice more. The lowlights will give you more of a natural look as you let the color grow out.

Do you color your hair a darker shade?
If you darken your hair on your own, it is probably worth your while to visit a professional for this transition. You should allow your hair to grow out for about two-to-three months, this way the stylist is able to get a goof idea of your natural hair color. Depending how dark you typically dye your hair, the stylist will with lighten the color or strip the color, either way, they have the goal of “lifting” the color. Once the color has been listed, they will re-color your hair by applying a solution that will produce your natural color. After that, your hair will continue to grow out and match the dye-job.

Have you been hiding grays?
If you’re ready to embrace your natural silver streaks, understand that the process may involve a bit more their the first two. Unfortunately, there isn’t a magic gray shade that works for everyone because believe it or not, everyone’s shade of gray is different. That said, here are a few options for you to consider when transitioning from chemically treated hair.

– Depending on your current hairstyle, you will benefit from frequent, shortcuts. Obviously, your natural hair color will fully grow out much faster if you’re rocking a pixie cut.

– Assuming that your hair isn’t totally gray yet, you can have your stylist put in some highlights or lowlights (whichever suit the color of your natural hair) to help with the transition until your natural hair has grown all the way out.

– Instead of coloring your hair with a permeate color, use a demi- permeate. Demi colors don’t completely cover grays and they fade rather quick. Although many people avoid demi’s for these reasons, it makes them a great choice to cover your new-growth roots with, since they will allow the gray to shine through and over time all will fade to your natural color.

Best Way To Get Rid Of Grays

Those aren’t gray hairs;
They’re strands of glitter growing from my head.
||Source: Pintrest||

The truth of the matter is no one likes going gray; however everyone sprouts a gray lock at some point in time, it’s simply inevitable! Fortunately, women have been opposed to going gray for quite some time now, which means there are age-old beauty hacks to fix the lifeless looking locks. Continue reading to first find out why hair your hair turns gray, and then learn the best ways to get rid of those pesky grays. You can thank us later.

Woman with white hair

Going Gray
Whether you sprouted your first gray the day before you graduated college or the after your daughter graduated college you hair went through the same process, here’s what happens: our human hair (as well as the hair of a considerable amount of other animals) naturally contains hydrogen peroxide within the hair follicle. In addition to hydrogen peroxide, the hair is made up of something called the hair catalase, which is comprised of enzymes. The enzymes in the catalase initiate the hydrogen peroxide in the hair to generate oxygen and water. This process occurs over and over when the hair is young. However, as the hair ages its enzyme catalase weakens, so the once-active conversion process slows and doesn’t take place as frequently as it once did. This means that the hydrogen peroxide begins to accumulate throughout the hair follicle, which in turn causes the hair to lose its color from the inside out. Of course, in losing its color it will begin to appear gray until you take action.

Woman with gray hair

Getting Rid of the Gray
With an understanding of why the hair decolorizes, you can combat the grays. Here are some tried and true, and scientific tips of how to do so.

  • Offset the gray color by distracting the eye with a mix of highlights and lowlights. While this isn’t changing the hair’s process of turning gray, it does allow you to hide the unwanted color.
  • Prepare one of the following:  black tea, curry leaves, ginger, henna, ridge guard (after you’ve done a few minutes of reading up on the product you choose, to find which one is best for you) and apply it on your locks. Keep in mind that naturally repairing gray hair takes time, and the most immediate result will always come from professionally applied artificial hair color.
  • If you are a smoker, here’s another reason to quit: not only can you prevent grays, but there is convincing evidence that you can reverse grays.
  • A wonderful way to manage gray hair, as well as your overall health, is to be sure that you’re consuming a balanced diet. Additionally, you should be most certain that you are getting the proper amounts of vitamin B12 and B6, as they are key to keeping your hair it’s natural color. Because we know it can be hard to maintain a balanced diet all the time, you can get into the habit of taking a vitamin B complex supplement every morning.

Are You A Cool Or A Warm Blonde?

Blonde woman

Have you ever had your hair colored to perfection, only to look into the mirror a few weeks later and notice that your hair had a strange yellow tint to it? If so, this yellow tint that you noticed is actually a Brassy tone. Brassy tones are probably the top complaint of those with blonde hair. That said, brassy tones are the result of extra blonde warm tones.

If you’re unsure of what all of this hair color mumbo jumbo means, check this out: When your stylist is creating the formula to color your hair, he or she is using a color wheel to determine which chemicals will make for the best color. Before mixing up the color, during the consulting part of the appointment you might hear her use the terms brassy and ashy. When referring to the entire color wheel, brassy or warm tones include the colors red, orange, and yellow, while ashy or cool tones include green, blue, and violet. However, when speaking only of the blonde spectrum it is easiest to think of a scale that goes from 1 to 15. Imagine the beginning of this scale being a warm yellow mustard color, but as the numbers on the scale progress to the center of the scale (say 7 or 8) it lightens to a neutral cream color. Because you can’t get much lighter than cream or white, the remainder of the scale will go from white to gray. Remember, yellow is at the start of the spectrum, and is considered a brassy color, which means it’s warm; thus the opposite side of the scale is cool. What does all this mean for you? Simply those whose blonde hair is more of a sweet sunny color are warm blondes. Of course, this means that those who have silver or platinum colored hair are cool blondes.

Now that you have a better idea of the difference between warm and cool blondes, you certainly have an understanding of why your bleach blonde isn’t as bleach colored as it once was – because for one reason or another the cool, ashy tones have faded to warm, brassy ones. Some ladies may be okay with the warmer tones but others can’t stand it! If you find that you’re one of those who isn’t a fan of the warmer tones, check out the tips below to reverse and prevent them!

  • Use a violet shampoo for regular maintenance. Since violet and yellow are on opposite sides of the color wheel, the purple color works to neutralize the brassy color. Sometimes violet or purple shampoos can be extremely drying, which is the last thing that vulnerable, bleached hair needs. Protract your hairs integrity while preventing brassiness by alternating violet shampoo with your regular shampoo every other day.
  • Use a violet conditioning treatment on a semi-regular basis. This is a great option if you are a fan of conditioning treatments and are able to find the time do them every-so-often.
  • Schedule a toning treatment with your stylist in-between root touch-up appointments. If you notice that the brassiness acts up during the summer it’s because the sand and salt water tend to do some serious damage to cool tones. It can be annoying, but it is also super easy for your stylist to take care of with a toning treatment.

Over the Rainbow

Rainbow hairstyle

Rainbow colored hair is one of the hottest trends in the beauty world right now! If you’re like the majority of women interested in the look, chances are you have no clue of how to go about the vibrant style. If you are feeling a bit lost in the clouds over the rainbow look – but that’s okay! Read on to gather the info of everything you need to know for rocking the rainbow.

Color and Incorporation
If you’re reading this article, chances are more than likely that you’ve already begun looking into the different colors and styles that fall under the umbrella term of Rainbow Hair. It seems that there are more and more options everyplace you look. If you know you want to go for the look, but are looking for some extra inspiration, here are a just a few of our favorite color palettes and a handful of ways to incorporate the color into your hair:

  • Standard Rainbow: Just as it sounds, standard rainbow uses the six elementary rainbow colors (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple).
  • Electric Rainbow: This selection of colors is just a bit different from the standard rainbow in that instead of sticking to the typical rainbow shades, the colors are amplified; think of using highlighters to color a rainbow, rather than crayons.
  • Unicorn: This theme is super delicate and ultimately favored by those who typically stick to lighter color palettes. Colors in the unicorn rainbow include silver and very light blue and pink.
  • Watermelon: The daring watermelon rainbow includes the two main colors of the juicy fruit, pink and green.

Keep in mind that the color themes mentioned above make a very limited list. There are many, many more rainbow hair colors including electric watermelon, sherbet, mermaid, and more; the color options are endless. Once you’ve chosen the colors for your new look, you’ll need to decide how you’re going to incorporate the color into your hair.

  • A (very) full set of highlights: this will give you multi-colored streaks evenly throughout your hair.
  • Rainbow Roots: With this method, the rainbow color will not be visible when your hair is styled straight and left down, however as soon as you curl your hair, put it up, or even run your fingers through it, the rainbow color will pop.
  • Under Lights: This is very similar to rainbow roots, the variance being that there is less color and it is more of a streaky color than a chunky root color.
  • Under Layer: this is similar to getting a partial set of highlights; instead of getting the color on top of your head it will be under layers of hair and only visible when you pull your hair up into a ponytail or bun.

When the Trend Ends…
Just like any other bright beauty trend, this one will one day come to an end, which is why it’s important to keep in mind that rainbow hair is a pretty hefty commitment. If you’re not sure you can handle the commitment, there are a number of ways to rock the rainbow with lesser commitment, such as semi-color, hair chalk, and colored hair spray. That said, if you’re up for the commitment, here are a few things you’ll want to keep in mind during the heat of the trend, as well as when the trend starts to die down:

  • More likely than not, your stylist will have to bleach your hair prior to adding in a multiplicity of colors. This means that your hair will be extremely fragile as it will have gone through a double process to get where you want it. To maintain your hair’s integrity, it’s a good idea to use a deep conditioning treatment once a week or so. Another way to care for your newly colored hair is to wash it less frequently, this way it has a chance to absorb all those natural oils before they get washed out.
  • Keep in mind the typical fading time for the colors you’ve chosen; you may have residual hair color when the rainbow trend begins to die down. The best thing you can do in this case is to let the color fade naturally. By doing so, you are prolonging any re-damaging of the hair that may happen when you choose to dye your hair again. Typically, green, blue, and purple take the longest to fade.
  • No matter what color you dye your hair, new growth will appear, giving you those oh-so-dreaded-roots. With a “typical” color, you can simply visit your stylist to re-high light the new-growth and solve the problem, but it doesn’t work quite the same with rainbow colored hair. Eventually, you will be waiting for your color to fade, as your roots grow in and the trend has ended. You don’t want to color the roots, as this would only defeat the purpose to letting the color fade. But, remember you did a double process, which means under all that color, the hair cuticle is much lighter than the root, which makes things difficult. The best way to avoid awkward roots is to allow your hair to go through the natural fading process and have your stylist help you get your hair color where you want it.

Summer 2016 Hair Hues

Women have been changing up their hairstyles for summer ever since new hair hues and fancy cuts became an option. Now that beach season is finally here, you may be yearning for the perfect new ‘do. This summer, its all about going lighter, brighter, and intense with those locks. Check out our list of summer 2016 hair hues, and get ready to heat up your look!

Nude
When it comes to fashion and makeup, nude tones are all the rage right now; it was only a matter of time before nude hair started gaining popularity. Nude is created through a balance of warm and cool tones. The opposing tones sort of “cancel” each other out and create a flattering natural color that looks great on all skin tones.

Pewter Blonde

DFree / Shutterstock.com

Pewter Blonde
Blonde is always a safe summer color but this summer, light blonde is turning up a notch! Pewter blonde is great for those who are already rocking beach-bum colored locks. Your stylist will likely make this look work for you by adding a full set of platinum highlights, then throwing in a few silver streaks. You can even request that your stylist to add in some honey or gold streaks in the front to help frame the face.

Watermelon
That’s right, your favorite summer snack might just be your favorite hair hue of summer 2016. Perhaps the most adventurous color trend of the season, watermelon hair is created through a double process. Your stylist will start by lifting or bleaching the hair so that it a ready for color, then (s)he will combine vivid greens  in the upper two-thirds, which will melt into sweet flirty pinks in the bottom portion of the hair.

creamy blonde hair hue

Creamy Blonde
For those of you who love blonde hues, but aren’t digging the rock ‘n’ roll vibe of pewter blonde, you might be interested in going for a creamy blonde color. Your stylist will add a mix of golden hues and white blonde hues, for a sexy, sophisticated, creamy blonde look that flatters just about every skin tone.

Color Bleed
The color bleed trend can be done with virtually any two hair colors, although we think the trend looks best on those with already-dark hair. Similar to an ombre, your stylist will gradually blend the vibrant color of your choice from the roots all the way down. When done correctly, it should not look like over-due new growth, rather the colors should just melt into each other.

Snowlights highlighting

Snow Lights
The trend of “snowlight” highlights began this spring and is getting more and more popular.  This new trend that every blonde girl should try is easy to achieve. Your stylist will take your hair to the next level by adding pale blonde highlights all throughout your hair, creating the illusion of lifted, shimmering locks.

Auburn Balayage
For all the girls who are in-love with Selena Gomez’s hair, but not to sure why, here’s your answer! Selena has been rocking her layered auburn balayage, and you can rock this look too! Ideal for longer-layered styles, your stylist will add dimension to already dark hair by strategically placing auburn colored streaks throughout the middle and end portions of the hair. You’ll leave the salon with locks that look like they’ve been kissed by sun.