Transitional Hair Care

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After years of chemical hair treatments, including coloring, dyeing, bleaching, relaxing, perming, and the like, many women choose to embrace their natural beauty and make the transition from chemically treated to natural hair. Making the transition can be tricky; women may find themselves wondering how long to wait until the chop off the damaged hair, others might be unsure of how to care for their hair during this time. To help with the confusion, this article tells of all the tips and tricks when embarking on transitional hair care.

  • Go big or go home: Plenty of women have multiple chemical treatments done throughout the course of a few months or years. For example, one woman may highlight her hair and get regular body waves, while another may color her hair and be a hair-relaxer regular. While there is nothing wrong with using beauty advancements to their fullest, when making the transition to natural hair, it’s important to stop all chemical treatments. Seriously, all of them.
  • Practice patience over prescience: When transitioning hair from treated to natural, it’s important to give the hair time to grow out and reclaim its natural shape. It takes an average of four-to-six months to let the natural hair grow out. With that said, it’s bound to take more or less time depending on the person. Remember to be patient; show your hair love by allowing it to do its own thing.
  • Chill out: Chemical treatments are known for damaging hair, unfortunately, so is the heat. With the hair in such a fragile and manipulative sate, heat tools (such as blow dryers and flat irons) are likely to cause more damage, and even prevents healthy regrowth. Instead, opt for air drying styles or absorbent hair towels.
  • Snip the snapped: As new healthy hair begins to grow, split and snapped ends will become more apparent. If they are bothersome, visit the salon for a trim. A stylist will be able to assess the hair, cut off whatever is dry and excessive, and suggest the best growth and trim timeline.
  • Start at the bottom: Brushing and combing through transitioning hair can be a pain, to say the least. Rather than starting at the crown of the head and pulling the brush down, start at the bottom. Begin by brushing the lowest three-to-six inches, once detangled, work on the above few inches. This makes the brushing process easier and less painful.
  • Take care when wet: It’s no secret that hair is easier to detangle when it’s clean and wet, this doesn’t change whether hair is chemically treated, natural, transitioning. It’s important to apply nourishing conditioners while in the shower. After letting the conditioner sit for a while, it is also an optimal time to comb through the hair with a wide-toothed comb. This helps to work the nourishing ingredients throughout every last strand.
  • Repair and prevent: As chemically treated hair is growing out, it’s important to continue caring for and showing it live. This will make the process much easier for a multitude of reasons. Additionally, it’s important to protect the new growth with leave in conditioners.

Transitioning from Chemically Treated Hair

Woman holding her hair

A study conducted in the year 2008 offered two results that stuck out to us; the first major result was that 75 percent of women in the US dye their hair on a regular basis. The second statistic which caught our attention as that a whopping 88 percent of American women feel that their hair has an effect on their confidence levels!

If you’re like the majority of women in the country, you’ve colored your hair for all kinds of reasons. Whether you’ve done so to hide a few grays or you just generally enjoy the ability to change the color of your hair, you may have finally decided that you’re ready to go chemical free and let your natural locks grow free. Many people find themselves at this point for a variety of reasons. Whatever your reason, we’re here to help; read on to find out how you can successfully transition from chemically treated hair.

Do you highlight your hair on the regular?
If so, your transition away from chemically treated hair is arguably the easiest. Simply work on growing out those locks without coloring them, keeping in mind that you’ll have to rock different colored roots for a few weeks. The roots aren’t all bad, though! Since the ombre look is in, you should totally embrace the look of your grown out dye job. If you can’t stand the outgrown look, that’s okay too. You can have low lights placed in, reaping the chemical benefits just once or twice more. The lowlights will give you more of a natural look as you let the color grow out.

Do you color your hair a darker shade?
If you darken your hair on your own, it is probably worth your while to visit a professional for this transition. You should allow your hair to grow out for about two-to-three months, this way the stylist is able to get a goof idea of your natural hair color. Depending how dark you typically dye your hair, the stylist will with lighten the color or strip the color, either way, they have the goal of “lifting” the color. Once the color has been listed, they will re-color your hair by applying a solution that will produce your natural color. After that, your hair will continue to grow out and match the dye-job.

Have you been hiding grays?
If you’re ready to embrace your natural silver streaks, understand that the process may involve a bit more their the first two. Unfortunately, there isn’t a magic gray shade that works for everyone because believe it or not, everyone’s shade of gray is different. That said, here are a few options for you to consider when transitioning from chemically treated hair.

– Depending on your current hairstyle, you will benefit from frequent, shortcuts. Obviously, your natural hair color will fully grow out much faster if you’re rocking a pixie cut.

– Assuming that your hair isn’t totally gray yet, you can have your stylist put in some highlights or lowlights (whichever suit the color of your natural hair) to help with the transition until your natural hair has grown all the way out.

– Instead of coloring your hair with a permeate color, use a demi- permeate. Demi colors don’t completely cover grays and they fade rather quick. Although many people avoid demi’s for these reasons, it makes them a great choice to cover your new-growth roots with, since they will allow the gray to shine through and over time all will fade to your natural color.