Transitioning from Chemically Treated Hair

Woman holding her hair

A study conducted in the year 2008 offered two results that stuck out to us; the first major result was that 75 percent of women in the US dye their hair on a regular basis. The second statistic which caught our attention as that a whopping 88 percent of American women feel that their hair has an effect on their confidence levels!

If you’re like the majority of women in the country, you’ve colored your hair for all kinds of reasons. Whether you’ve done so to hide a few grays or you just generally enjoy the ability to change the color of your hair, you may have finally decided that you’re ready to go chemical free and let your natural locks grow free. Many people find themselves at this point for a variety of reasons. Whatever your reason, we’re here to help; read on to find out how you can successfully transition from chemically treated hair.

Do you highlight your hair on the regular?
If so, your transition away from chemically treated hair is arguably the easiest. Simply work on growing out those locks without coloring them, keeping in mind that you’ll have to rock different colored roots for a few weeks. The roots aren’t all bad, though! Since the ombre look is in, you should totally embrace the look of your grown out dye job. If you can’t stand the outgrown look, that’s okay too. You can have low lights placed in, reaping the chemical benefits just once or twice more. The lowlights will give you more of a natural look as you let the color grow out.

Do you color your hair a darker shade?
If you darken your hair on your own, it is probably worth your while to visit a professional for this transition. You should allow your hair to grow out for about two-to-three months, this way the stylist is able to get a goof idea of your natural hair color. Depending how dark you typically dye your hair, the stylist will with lighten the color or strip the color, either way, they have the goal of “lifting” the color. Once the color has been listed, they will re-color your hair by applying a solution that will produce your natural color. After that, your hair will continue to grow out and match the dye-job.

Have you been hiding grays?
If you’re ready to embrace your natural silver streaks, understand that the process may involve a bit more their the first two. Unfortunately, there isn’t a magic gray shade that works for everyone because believe it or not, everyone’s shade of gray is different. That said, here are a few options for you to consider when transitioning from chemically treated hair.

– Depending on your current hairstyle, you will benefit from frequent, shortcuts. Obviously, your natural hair color will fully grow out much faster if you’re rocking a pixie cut.

– Assuming that your hair isn’t totally gray yet, you can have your stylist put in some highlights or lowlights (whichever suit the color of your natural hair) to help with the transition until your natural hair has grown all the way out.

– Instead of coloring your hair with a permeate color, use a demi- permeate. Demi colors don’t completely cover grays and they fade rather quick. Although many people avoid demi’s for these reasons, it makes them a great choice to cover your new-growth roots with, since they will allow the gray to shine through and over time all will fade to your natural color.

Over the Rainbow

Rainbow hairstyle

Rainbow colored hair is one of the hottest trends in the beauty world right now! If you’re like the majority of women interested in the look, chances are you have no clue of how to go about the vibrant style. If you are feeling a bit lost in the clouds over the rainbow look – but that’s okay! Read on to gather the info of everything you need to know for rocking the rainbow.

Color and Incorporation
If you’re reading this article, chances are more than likely that you’ve already begun looking into the different colors and styles that fall under the umbrella term of Rainbow Hair. It seems that there are more and more options everyplace you look. If you know you want to go for the look, but are looking for some extra inspiration, here are a just a few of our favorite color palettes and a handful of ways to incorporate the color into your hair:

  • Standard Rainbow: Just as it sounds, standard rainbow uses the six elementary rainbow colors (red, orange, yellow, green, blue, and purple).
  • Electric Rainbow: This selection of colors is just a bit different from the standard rainbow in that instead of sticking to the typical rainbow shades, the colors are amplified; think of using highlighters to color a rainbow, rather than crayons.
  • Unicorn: This theme is super delicate and ultimately favored by those who typically stick to lighter color palettes. Colors in the unicorn rainbow include silver and very light blue and pink.
  • Watermelon: The daring watermelon rainbow includes the two main colors of the juicy fruit, pink and green.

Keep in mind that the color themes mentioned above make a very limited list. There are many, many more rainbow hair colors including electric watermelon, sherbet, mermaid, and more; the color options are endless. Once you’ve chosen the colors for your new look, you’ll need to decide how you’re going to incorporate the color into your hair.

  • A (very) full set of highlights: this will give you multi-colored streaks evenly throughout your hair.
  • Rainbow Roots: With this method, the rainbow color will not be visible when your hair is styled straight and left down, however as soon as you curl your hair, put it up, or even run your fingers through it, the rainbow color will pop.
  • Under Lights: This is very similar to rainbow roots, the variance being that there is less color and it is more of a streaky color than a chunky root color.
  • Under Layer: this is similar to getting a partial set of highlights; instead of getting the color on top of your head it will be under layers of hair and only visible when you pull your hair up into a ponytail or bun.

When the Trend Ends…
Just like any other bright beauty trend, this one will one day come to an end, which is why it’s important to keep in mind that rainbow hair is a pretty hefty commitment. If you’re not sure you can handle the commitment, there are a number of ways to rock the rainbow with lesser commitment, such as semi-color, hair chalk, and colored hair spray. That said, if you’re up for the commitment, here are a few things you’ll want to keep in mind during the heat of the trend, as well as when the trend starts to die down:

  • More likely than not, your stylist will have to bleach your hair prior to adding in a multiplicity of colors. This means that your hair will be extremely fragile as it will have gone through a double process to get where you want it. To maintain your hair’s integrity, it’s a good idea to use a deep conditioning treatment once a week or so. Another way to care for your newly colored hair is to wash it less frequently, this way it has a chance to absorb all those natural oils before they get washed out.
  • Keep in mind the typical fading time for the colors you’ve chosen; you may have residual hair color when the rainbow trend begins to die down. The best thing you can do in this case is to let the color fade naturally. By doing so, you are prolonging any re-damaging of the hair that may happen when you choose to dye your hair again. Typically, green, blue, and purple take the longest to fade.
  • No matter what color you dye your hair, new growth will appear, giving you those oh-so-dreaded-roots. With a “typical” color, you can simply visit your stylist to re-high light the new-growth and solve the problem, but it doesn’t work quite the same with rainbow colored hair. Eventually, you will be waiting for your color to fade, as your roots grow in and the trend has ended. You don’t want to color the roots, as this would only defeat the purpose to letting the color fade. But, remember you did a double process, which means under all that color, the hair cuticle is much lighter than the root, which makes things difficult. The best way to avoid awkward roots is to allow your hair to go through the natural fading process and have your stylist help you get your hair color where you want it.

Color Trend Alert: Ecaille

Woman with ecaille hair

Color trends come and color trends go, and this season, there are a few that are taking off like a rocket, leaving old styles in the dust! Move over Ombre–There’s a new player in town–and from the looks of things–and the incredible shine, this one’s here to stay! Say “hello” to Ecaille, which is the French word for “tortoiseshell.” With a lot less whammo than the currently somewhat fading Ombre trend (no pun intended, hehe,) Ecaille provides both lovers of ombre and those who just felt it was a bit harsh for their style a superb hair coloring transition to the next big thing, that has every bit as much richness and impressive eye catching detail as all other preceding hair coloring methods. Ecaille is more of a “something for everyone” kind of color choice, giving hair a gorgeous look from employment of richly transacted chocolates and chestnut undertones with caramels and golden tones that start out at their darkest value closest to the roots, and from there, seamlessly move into lighter-toned brightness on their way downward to the ends.

Looser, Intentionally for Outstanding Results
Ecaille can be distinguished in more than the final product, which is a gorgeously rendered form of innovative hair coloring that is less advertised that a chemical process was responsible, yet it does convey excellence on every level. The process by which Ecaille is rendered might initially seem to be a step backward in today’s hair coloring technology, but this imagined backward step is actually a key component in the beautiful results of Ecaille. The look is vibrantly dynamic and produced by skipping the tedium of foils, and cutting right to the chase implementing Balayage (AKA Baliage) which involves the application of highlights carefully and strategically performed “sans foils,” or as loose and more casual in method, but not in the final result of some absolutely gorgeous color that is rich with undertones and vibrancy–and was shine mentioned? This color and style is all about shine, ultimately giving the hair a vibrant healthy appearance and the shine serves to more vividly reveal the multifaceted colorations.

Ecaille hair

A Ramped-up Ombre, Taken to a Different Level
You would not be incorrect to refer to this hair coloring technique as ecaille tortoiseshell ombre. The lighter gradation is still key, but it begins closer to the scalp and is a more gradual migration toward the ends. It’s especially great for brunettes to enjoy going lighter in a very richly varied manner. Blondes may at first need to darken their base color in order to show the transitioning color toward the golden hues at the ends. With its very natural effects from eliminating the presence of other coloring methods with stark tone and color differentiations, one thing is sure; you can expect to see a lot more ecaille hair than the basic ombre ever touched.

We want to hear from you! Tell us all about your Ecaille experience – the good, the bad and the ugly!