Experimenting With Dip-Dyed Hair

woman with dip-dyed hair

Dip-dye and ombre colored hair have been quite popular for a few years now. The looks can be seen in both hi-fashion and street-style, and now you’re ready to give the trend a try too. You may be wondering what the difference is between dip-dyed and ombre colored hair; some of you might not have even known that there was a difference. Well, ladies, there is indeed a difference between dip-died and ombre hair! The easiest way to differentiate between the two is recognizing that ombre-colored-anything is the gradual process of once color smoothly blending into another. So when you look at ombre hair, you will notice that the chemically colored ends of the hair get gradually get lighter and lighter along the strands. Dip-dye, on the other hand, offers more of a solid transition from one color to the next – almost like a color block.

If you’re interested in dip-dyed hair, but aren’t ready to call your stylist and take the plunge at the salon that’s totally understandable. This bold look can be…well, bold. Which is why we’ve put together this step by step tutorial for you to experiment with dip-dyed hair at home. In doing so you should be able to get a good idea of how you feel about the look and if you think it’s something you’d want to consider more permanently.

  1. Before you go coloring your hair all shades of the rainbow, take the time to get inspired and figure out the color that you want. Even though this tutorial is only going to give you temporary color, it’s still going to stay put for a few weeks, so you’ll want to make sure that it’s a color you’ll be happy with.
  2. Once you’ve settled on a color, you’ll need to purchase a product that is labeled as “semi-permeate.” This will ensure that the color doesn’t last for months.
  3. In addition to the coloring product, those with darker hair may need to purchase a  lightening or bleaching product. The reason being that light colored tips is the key to achieving the actual color that you want; bleaching out the dark color from your hair allows the colored dye to set.
  4. When preparing to dip-dye, you should purchase more color than you think you need. It may seem silly, but the last thing you want to do is run out of color before you’ve completed coloring your hair. You should also purchase a pair of gloves, to avoid skin irritation and some sort of plastic cover-all for your counters.
  5. Be sure that you’re wearing an old shirt that you wouldn’t mind throwing out. Additionally, wrap your neck with an equally old towel to protect your skin from stain and irritation.
  6. Brush or comb hair that it already completely dry and set up all your products in front of you on the countertop. It’s easiest to do this in the bathroom that way you have a mirror right where you need it.
  7. Section by section, bleach the hair where you want the finished color to be. Because every bleaching product is different, it’s best that you follow the instructions for the product that you purchased.
  8. After you’ve rinsed out the bleach, repeat the same process with the color, directly on top of the bleached hair. You can either use a brush and paint it on, or you can literally dip each section of hair into the dye bowl and use your fingers to spread the color.
  9. After you’ve applied the color to each section wrap it in foil. This will help the product cure faster. Again, to ensure the best possible results from the product you purchased, follow the instructions on how long to let the product sit on the hair.
  10. Once the product has had enough time to color your locks, remove the foil wrappings and rinse the product out of your hair until the water runs clear. After the product is rinsed out wash your entire head of hair with conditioner only. Keep in mind that the more frequently that you wash your hair, the sooner the color will fade.

Are You A Cool Or A Warm Blonde?

Blonde woman

Have you ever had your hair colored to perfection, only to look into the mirror a few weeks later and notice that your hair had a strange yellow tint to it? If so, this yellow tint that you noticed is actually a Brassy tone. Brassy tones are probably the top complaint of those with blonde hair. That said, brassy tones are the result of extra blonde warm tones.

If you’re unsure of what all of this hair color mumbo jumbo means, check this out: When your stylist is creating the formula to color your hair, he or she is using a color wheel to determine which chemicals will make for the best color. Before mixing up the color, during the consulting part of the appointment you might hear her use the terms brassy and ashy. When referring to the entire color wheel, brassy or warm tones include the colors red, orange, and yellow, while ashy or cool tones include green, blue, and violet. However, when speaking only of the blonde spectrum it is easiest to think of a scale that goes from 1 to 15. Imagine the beginning of this scale being a warm yellow mustard color, but as the numbers on the scale progress to the center of the scale (say 7 or 8) it lightens to a neutral cream color. Because you can’t get much lighter than cream or white, the remainder of the scale will go from white to gray. Remember, yellow is at the start of the spectrum, and is considered a brassy color, which means it’s warm; thus the opposite side of the scale is cool. What does all this mean for you? Simply those whose blonde hair is more of a sweet sunny color are warm blondes. Of course, this means that those who have silver or platinum colored hair are cool blondes.

Now that you have a better idea of the difference between warm and cool blondes, you certainly have an understanding of why your bleach blonde isn’t as bleach colored as it once was – because for one reason or another the cool, ashy tones have faded to warm, brassy ones. Some ladies may be okay with the warmer tones but others can’t stand it! If you find that you’re one of those who isn’t a fan of the warmer tones, check out the tips below to reverse and prevent them!

  • Use a violet shampoo for regular maintenance. Since violet and yellow are on opposite sides of the color wheel, the purple color works to neutralize the brassy color. Sometimes violet or purple shampoos can be extremely drying, which is the last thing that vulnerable, bleached hair needs. Protract your hairs integrity while preventing brassiness by alternating violet shampoo with your regular shampoo every other day.
  • Use a violet conditioning treatment on a semi-regular basis. This is a great option if you are a fan of conditioning treatments and are able to find the time do them every-so-often.
  • Schedule a toning treatment with your stylist in-between root touch-up appointments. If you notice that the brassiness acts up during the summer it’s because the sand and salt water tend to do some serious damage to cool tones. It can be annoying, but it is also super easy for your stylist to take care of with a toning treatment.

Rainbow Hair Secrets

Rainbow hair has become one of this year’s hottest beauty trends. Everyone from teen girls to grown women are opting for rainbow colored locks, and it’s no wonder – it looks so cool, so summery, and so bright – who wouldn’t want to be surrounded with the colors they love? Perhaps some do it to represent certain things that have meaning to them, and others do it because they love the colors they choose. Today, Lionesse would like to dive into some of the secrets behind rainbow hair and provide them to you in this article below.

Woman getting her hair bleached in a salon.

Hair Bleaching
Many people aren’t aware that when they decide they want to opt for a rainbow hairstyle or vibrant, unnatural color, they will need to complete the process of bleaching the hair. Whether they are opting for dyed rainbow tips, or streaks, or a full head of color, bleach is the go-to product to use before opting to apply the color. Without applying the bleach, the color more than likely will just wash right out and won’t even take to the hair. After you complete the bleaching process, it’s important to thoroughly wash the hair, condition the hair, and then blow-dry the hair or allow it to air dry completely before going in with any sort of rainbow hair color. If the hair is not dry, the dye will not take. Remember, bleaching the hair does damage the hair, but if you’re only dying the ends or tips of your hair, you don’t have much to worry about in terms of long term effect or damage – the ends can always be trimmed if need be.

Woman with bright rainbow colored hairstyle.

Choose Colors You Love
When it comes to choosing rainbow hair colors, you can feel free to choose colors you love. Rainbow hair is all about having fun. You can actually opt for just about any color you want, and combine them with other colors as well, without worrying too much about whether or not they suit you. That would be like holding a box of Crayola markers up to your hair and asking yourself, “Which marker would look better in my hair?” The point here is to love the colors you choose and just do it! If you are combining more than one color with another, just be sure those two colors go together well before beginning the application, such as light pink and light blue, fuchsia and teal, or sea-green and lavender purple.

Woman with sexy rainbow colored hair.

Choose a Rainbow Style that Suits Your Lifestyle
If you work in a respectable office position, chances are, they won’t take kindly to you showing up in the office with a hair full of Rainbow Brite. In this case, you can still dye the ends of your hair whatever rainbow colors you want to – and opt for wearing your hair up when at work, and down when you’re at play. If you work in an art studio, chances are, you will be able to get away with a full head of color. Be sure to make the right decision before going head first – literally.